Five people arrested on drug charges in Dayton

The Liberty County Pct. 4 Constable’s Office wrapped up a narcotics investigation on Tuesday, Nov. 22, that resulted in five arrests at a home at 406 E. Houston St., Dayton.

The investigation allowed the constable’s office to obtain a search warrant from Liberty County 75th State District Judge Mark Morefield. On Tuesday morning, Pct. 4 deputies, assisted by the Liberty County Sheriff’s Special Response Team and Dayton Police Department, executed the search warrant.

During the course of the search, law enforcement officers seized approximately 48 grams of suspected methamphetamine, approximately 3.5 grams of suspected crack cocaine, approximately 16 grams of suspected marijuana, digital scales and drug paraphernalia.

“Multiple suspects were detained at the scene and those arrested were transported to the Liberty County Jail for incarceration,” according to a statement from Pct. 4 Constable Robby Thornton.

The suspects and the charges against them are:

  • Darius Hurst, 25, of Crosby: one count of Manufacture or Delivery of a Controlled Substance in Penalty Group 1, 200 to 400 grams, in a drug-free zone (first degree felony); one count of Manufacture or Delivery of a Controlled Substance in Penalty Group 2, 1 to 4 grams, in a drug-free zone (first degree felony); and one count of Possession of Marijuana, less than two ounces, in a drug-free zone (Class A misdemeanor).
  • Krystal Simmons, 42: one count of Manufacture or Delivery of a Controlled Substance, in Penalty Group 1, 200 to 400 grams, in a drug-free zone (first degree felony).
  • Keith Williams, 46, of Dayton: one count of Manufacture or Delivery of a Controlled Substance in Penalty Group 1, 1 to 4 grams, in a drug-free zone (second degree felony);
  • Mercedes Wright, 23, of Dayton: one count of Possession of Marijuana, less than two ounces, in a drug-free zone (Class A misdemeanor).
  • Ivery Mouton, 38, of Dayton: one count of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia (Class C misdemeanor).

Thornton asks that anyone with information about criminal activity in their neighborhoods call local law enforcement or his office by emailing robby.thornton@co.liberty.tx.us or calling 936-258-4711. All tips will be held in the strictest of confidence.

Thornton reminds residents to be patient as some investigations can be lengthy.

Recent news article involving another alleged drug bust by the Pct. 4 Constable’s Office:

15 COMMENTS

    • She has had many (ALIAS NAMES)…Parker, Simmons…can’t change that face though or what she has been doing for the last 20 plus years…just think she had everyone fooled! Now, all can see, just like an acquaintance of her’s that’s been doing the same for 20 plus years and got caught! Maybe that friend got off on a lighter sentence because SHE sold her out, among others SHE was dealing with! Man, how they start singing when they fixing to go DOWN!

      • I’d actually love to talk more with you about her if you’d allow me to, that’s my mom and I’m 23 years old and I still can’t get the truth from her, so I’d love to hear it from someone else

  1. I haven’t been affected on a personal level by the opioid addiction/overdose crisis in my country; but I have suffered sufficiently unrelenting ACE-related intense anxiety to have known, enjoyed and appreciated the great release upon consuming alcohol and/or THC. Yet, I once was one of those who, while sympathetic, would look down on those who’d ‘allowed’ themselves to become addicted to alcohol and/or illicit ‘hard’ drugs.

    However, upon learning that serious life trauma, notably adverse childhood experiences, is very often behind the addict’s debilitating addiction, I began to understand ball-and-chain self-medicating: The greater the drug-induced euphoria/escape one attains from its use, the more one wants to repeat the experience; and the more intolerable one finds their sober reality, the more pleasurable that escape should be perceived. By extension, the greater one’s mental pain or trauma while sober, the greater the need for escape from reality, thus the more addictive the euphoric escape-form will likely be.

    Lasting PTSD mental pain is very formidable yet invisibly confined to inside one’s head. It is solitarily suffered, unlike an openly visible physical disability or condition, which tends to elicit sympathy/empathy from others. It can make every day a mental ordeal, unless the turmoil is prescription and/or illicitly medicated.

    Meantime, the preconceived erroneous notion that drug addicts are simply weak-willed and/or have committed a moral crime is, quite fortunately, gradually diminishing. Also, we now know that Western pharmaceutical corporations intentionally pushed their very addictive and profitable opiates — I call it by far the real moral crime — for which they got off relatively lightly, considering the resulting immense suffering and overdose death numbers.

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